Speak Up!- Podcast for Matured Martial Artists

I had a great pleasure to talk with Sensei Matt Jardin about mental health, martial arts and brain.

Matt honoured me to be his first guest, I have thoroughly enjoyed this conversation, Matt has the gift to make you instantly welcomed and comfortable.

Please have a look at our conversation below.

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About the author: Les Bubka is an experienced martial artist, personal trainer and therapist who specialises in posture, mobility and Karate.  Les works with a wide variety of clients including martial artists and athletes as well as those suffering with postural dysfunction or those who wish to improve their fitness and wellbeing

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I hit Sensei !

A few recent events and conversations at the dojo inspired me to write this article.

The first event was during a sparring session when one of my students delivered a lovely, spot on, spinning back fist that nearly took my head off. The second was during another sparring session where I had a good rear naked choke on a student. As he was doing a good job of getting out from it I allowed him to escape.

 

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I didn’t think that either of these situations were unusual until we started to chat about it afterwards. I have to mention here that many of my students are already experienced martial artists and so have backgrounds of training and gaining achievements in other clubs.

 

What was surprising for me was their reaction to these events. In the first instance, after this lovely back fist my student got scared. I was puzzled, why would she be afraid? So I asked “what’s wrong?” She replied “I’m worried that now you’ll punish me like my old sensei did.” I replied “why would I punish you? I’m congratulating you as you delivered a perfect shot at the right time, it was superb.” She asked me if I was not embarrassed that a student had hit me in front of the rest of the class? Well we’ll get to that a bit later.

 

The second situation was similar. The student had a previous background in martial arts and he was puzzled, asking why didn’t I finish him? I had the opportunity to do so. His previous teacher had always done that, showing him that he was a lesser fighter than the teacher.

DSC_0856 - CopyI don’t attempt to criticise other instructors as everyone has their own methodology of teaching. My view on this is that as a coach I try to point out the best in my students, and the way to do this is to support, motivate, and praise them but to also be honest. If they do something incorrectly I let them know. If something is done properly they are always acknowledged. This applies to all training aspects from kihon to sparring. As a coach I have to leave my ego outside of the dojo for the benefit of my students.

 

My approach is to get the best out of students. When I see that they have an opportunity to execute a correct technique no matter if it’s a strike, kick, lock or choke, I allow them. It doesn’t make me weak or embarrassed and gives motivation to my students that they can get me. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not easing off but I make it possible with effort to achieve. Always making sure that I praise them for their achievement. I don’t get upset if a student, regardless of their grade, will catch me with a great punch and I don’t need to get revenge or punish them. I enjoy their progression as it shows me that I have taught them correctly.

 

As someone who suffers with anxiety, this is one of the few areas that I feel confident that I know my value and I don’t feel embarrassed or a lesser man if a girl with a white belt will choke me out, she simply did a good technique.

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This approach builds trust between a coach and a student. Students know that no matter what they will be treated with respect, building the right behaviour model when they spar with someone else in my dojo. No one is trying to show superiority and all of the students and instructors respect each other. This attitude makes me proud to be a part of a great team of like minded people.

 

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About the author: Les Bubka is an experienced martial artist, personal trainer and therapist who specialises in posture, mobility and Karate.  Les works with a wide variety of clients including martial artists and athletes as well as those suffering with postural dysfunction or those who wish to improve their fitness and wellbeing

Tai Sabaki – Body Managment

Hi all,

At yesterday’s session we had a look at ways of unbalancing our opponent, clip below is result of our discussion at the club.

This is one of the possible uses of the Tai Sabaki

Kind regards,

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About the author: Les Bubka is an experienced martial artist, personal trainer and therapist who specialises in posture, mobility and Karate.  Les works with a wide variety of clients including martial artists and athletes as well as those suffering with postural dysfunction or those who wish to improve their fitness and wellbeing

Project Aspire

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A few years back I was wondering how I could reach a wider range of students and provide classes based on Karate for their benefit.  My idea was to create an inclusive club where everyone can participate and find something for themselves regardless of their status, ability or age and improve their wellbeing both physically and mentality.

This idea was supported by a very special group of people led by Ms Samantha Hutchison, with the involvement of community wardens Tracy James and Garry Jones.

FB_IMG_1561027606419They have all patiently listened to my ideas and explained the procedures for applying for funding along with all of the terms and conditions. All of this work resulted in the award of two grants from Project Aspire – one for a senior exercise club at Merrow and the second for an inclusive Karate club at Queen Elizabeth Park.

imageWith the support of Project Aspire we have managed to start up and build not only exercises groups but community hubs for a vast spectrum of people. Members of these clubs include adults of all ages from 18 to over 80, with all enjoying the beautiful art of Karate. Students with autism, multiple sclerosis, hearing impairment, physical disability and ill mental health are reaping the benefits of physical activity in a non-judgmental environment improving their skills, confidence and self-worth.

Thanks to the openness and good will of the Project Aspire team these clubs have been able to improve social interaction and provide support to the community within Guildford, promoting a healthy lifestyle. This demonstrates that with a little support from local authorities at a grass roots level direct help can be provided to people improving their quality of life and creating a sense of community.

Adapting Karate

Big part of my karate is teaching, I teach many different people. Some of them have disabilities, autism or  not so young. In order to provide a quality sessions i have to adapt program to specific needs. Through the years of working with different charities I have developed my own specific way of modifying Karate. I’m happy that there is more recognition for my work and there is an interest in seminars with me.

For those who asked me about teaching more about Taiso project,  I have planned for next year few seminars on the subject. Please have look below on sample clip of how I modify Kata . In this case both ladies have problems with balance making Seienchin Kata very difficult to perform standing.

Kind regards

Les

Tegumi – Karate’s Grappling

Short clip of our Tegumi (grappling) based on techniques found in kata, from Pinan series to Seipai. Throws are not performed correctly due to lack of soft floor. If you like the clip please Like, Share and Subscribe.

To learn and practice this application please seek instruction under the supervision of a qualified Sensei.

Thanks for watching!

https://www.shinaidokarate.com

Kind regards, Les

Anxiety effects on Kata performance – Naihanchi

Hi all,

It was a while I joined in  conversation due to busy family life, last week I thought i will record some kata at the dojo.

That night was sleepless due to baby not well, day was not great either -toddler become a terrorist and did not cooperate at all, our baby girl was not well and grumpy all day. i was tired and frustrated, also my anxiety kicked in (which you can see on the clip, nervously looking around).

My perfect Naihanchi never happened, more I tried more mistakes I made. My performance dropped about 60% (personal opinion) best what I could do is to stop and let it go, with the plan to do better next time.

What coping strategies you guys and girls have i this type situations?

Kind regards

Les